Don’t Try This at Home: A Year in the Life of Dave Navarro

April 28, 2017 - Comment

Step into the booth. Check your judgments at the curtain. Close your eyes. Listen: you can hear the voices of the visitors who sat here before you: some of the most twisted, drug-addled, deviant, lonely, lost, brilliant characters ever to be caught on film. What do you have to offer the booth? Andy Warhol was

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Step into the booth. Check your judgments at the curtain. Close your eyes. Listen: you can hear the voices of the visitors who sat here before you: some of the most twisted, drug-addled, deviant, lonely, lost, brilliant characters ever to be caught on film. What do you have to offer the booth?

Andy Warhol was so enamored with Polaroids that he made special arrangements with the company to purchase all the overstock film of a discontinued model of camera. A similar photographic fetish is the organizing principle of Don’t Try This at Home. For kicks, rocker and author Dave Navarro installed a carnival-grade photo booth in his L.A. home. The book documents a year’s worth of visitors to Navarro’s pad who all stepped into the booth to get their mug shots snapped.

The resulting dispatch from Hell is as hard to draw one’s eyes from as a twelve car pile-up. Intermingled with a parade of rock stars, models, prostitutes, drug dealers, pizza delivery guys, and housecleaners are a series of observations and interviews with Dave and his co-author Neil Strauss. Strauss, co-author of other tomes for Jenna Jameson, Marilyn Manson, and Motley Crue, operates less as an editor than as a ringmaster to this debauched thing rock stars call a lifestyle.

Don’t Try This At Home is one rollicking contact high of a memoir. Just set it on the coffee table at your home and watch how quickly it snares its readers. -–Ryan Boudinot

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Comments

Uncle Pink says:

A Good Insight Into the Life of a Rock Star Addict This dude was out of his mind on drugs, and it was interesting to see the life of an addict from the inside. The writer was at Dave’s house all the time with all the crazy visitors coming in and out and taking pictures in the photo booth. I would have liked to have seen captions in the photo booth pictures to say who all the people were. 

Dana says:

Raw and Honest! So raw and honest. I have loved Dave forever, but now I love him even more. Allowing us into his world was so brave. Showing the very dark side of addiction and depression hopefully will help others to get help. I am so thankful Dave made it out alive and is doing well. This book was so well written. I loved how it went between passages written by Dave, passages described by Neil and conversations that were transcribed. Loved the pictures also!

SavaFiend76 says:

Not one of Neil Strauss’s best efforts I really felt like this rambled far too much, and I place the blame for that on Neil Strauss, since he was the one documenting everything and putting the book together. Everything is very disjointed, and although that certainly reflects Dave’s mental state and addict life at the time, it does not make for good reading. I did feel like this book really brought the life of an addict out into the open, and think that anyone who might not understand addiction could learn something by reading it and…

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